Common Mistakes to Avoid if You Represent Yourself

Common Mistakes to Avoid if You Represent Yourself

Going to court in “street clothes.”

Although perhaps it shouldn’t matter what you look like, it does. Show that you take your serious court matter seriously by dressing in a professional or at least business casual way.

 

Having arguments with the other party during a hearing.

You may be mad, they may be lying, but wait, you will get your opportunity to speak, but only to the judge.

Not bringing supporting evidence for your claims.

If you say the other party did something bring a photograph or a bill or a witness who saw the event. Otherwise, it’s the ‘ol “he say, she say.”

Raising your voice, getting heated, talking out of turn, talking under your breath, or storming out in the middle of your hearing.

These are just not appropriate behaviors in court, you won’t be as effective in getting the important points to the judge, and the judge will likely see you as “acting up.”

And finally, if you do not know what to bring to court, what to say, or how to be most effective in representing your case, please consult a lawyer and consider hiring one.

Lawyers are trained to put on the best case for you that they can.  See our services: we offer full representation and unbundled services, including coaching, drafting or reviewing documents you draft, and any combination of these.

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